High Country Cowboys and Eagles in Whitefish

And finally, for understanding the way you and the  neighbors can find the best fit for you in a new community, let’s turn to the other Rustic Eagle lifestyles.

Photo: Visual Hunt
In the PRIZM list of lifestyles, then, Blue Highways describes lower middle-class couples and families who live in isolated towns and farmsteads.

Part One: Flocking

An excerpt from Book Three in “The Knowledge Path Series” dedicated to helping you find the place of your dreams.

With the help of our knowledge bank, you can choose for variations in your new neighborhood by:

Two of the four possible.

Rural Cowboys (HCERC), 45Y3T3.

Photo: Google Maps

The first of the two  High Country Eagles, Rural Cowboys — HCERC share the Middle America social group characteristics and the

The 2011 PRIZM statistics place them in the

“lower-mid income level (45th out of 66) with median household incomes at $43,023. Out of all US households, they account for under 2% (1.55%) for a total 1,809,961.”

Out of six segments of the Middle America social group 45Y3T3 is the younger of Whitefish’s two — and

“one of seven striving single lifestyles which as a group live in 12,665,698 households with a median household income of $33,160.”

Fifty years ago the most complex thing about maps was trying to fold them up the right way.

On folding paper maps blue highways represent two-lane roads that “wind through remote stretches of the American landscape.”

Photo: Visual Hunt

In the PRIZM list of lifestyles, then, Blue Highways describes lower middle-class couples and families who live in isolated towns and farmsteads.

Sharing the same pursuits as other Whitefish Wireless Resorters and High Country Eagles, they

“like to hunt and fish, the women enjoy sewing and crafts, and everyone looks forward to going out to a country music concert.”

Photo: Visual Hunt

And, they’re likely to:

“Read Guns & Ammo, drive a Chevrolet Colorado and shop at Wal-Mart. Getting television reception in isolated towns means they probably own a satellite dish and watch auto racing.”

And finally, for understanding the way you and the  neighbors can find the best fit for you in a new community, let’s turn to the other Rustic Eagle lifestyles.

Rustic Eagles (HCERE), 58M4T4.

The second of Whitefish’s High Country Eagles, Rustic Eagles (HCERE) are the much older (M4) neighbors of WRDE Distant Exurbans – 48Y3T4 – the young and restless striving singles living at the greatest distance from the center of town (T4).

Photo: Visual Hunt

Rustic Eagles are the downscale demographic who are the more mature residents who live in households without children.

The 58M4T4 Rustic Eagles fit into one of PRIZM’s nine “Sustaining Seniors” segments filled with older, economically challenged Americans.

As a group sustaining seniors are:

“Racially mixed and dispersed throughout the country, they all score high for having residents who are over 65 years old and household incomes under $25,000.

Many are single or widowed, have modest educational achievement and live in older apartments or small homes.”

On their fixed incomes, they lead low-key, home-centered lifestyles.

“They’re big on watching TV, gardening, sewing and woodworking. Their social life often revolves around activities at veterans clubs and fraternal organizations.”

And as a group of all nine M4 sustaining seniors as of 2011…

  • lived in just over 12 million American households (12,101,672)
  • with median household incomes of $29,346.

As one of six PRIZM “Rustic Living” segments (and the second of ’s T4 neighbors) in 2011 …

  • they lived in slightly more US households (13,401,489) and
  • lived on more household income ($31,343).
Photo: Visual Hunt

The  Rustic Eagles (HCERE), 58M4T4 profiles is known as Back Country Folks  in the PRIZM lifestyle categories.

They are “along way away from economic paradise.

The residents tend to be poor, over 55 years old and living in older, modest-sized homes and manufactured housing.

Typically, life in this segment is a throwback to an earlier era when farming dominated the American landscape.”

Mostly retired, these 65+ seniors have below average income producing assets, but they mostly own their own homes.

Growing up on farms in remote rural areas, they have completed some high school course.

In 2011, “they more than 2.5 million homes (2,658,532) or 2.27% of all US households. 

With a median household income of $32,207, they tend order from Publishers Clearing House, read Hunting, and watch Soapnet.

And, they more than likely drive a Ford Ranger when they attend board meetings at their local church.”

We’re going to fast forward to 2015.

Given what we now know about Whitefish’s 2008 profile and the 2010 taxing developments, would the California transplants Dudley and Arthur and the long-term locals, Charles and his brother enjoy or hate changes in Whitefish’s neighborhoods and with a mix of new residents?

Steps:

25) Compare what “life” was like in those communities before the Great Recession, how resilient each was during the economic downturn, and to what degree did each bounce back after with any “economic hangover.”

26) If you know the zip code you can discover the lifestyles living in the community. You can compare your profile with theirs to estimate your degree of fit.

27) Estimate how well suited you are for the resorts. Refer to “Profiles-at-a-Glance” comparing 2008-2009 and 2013-2014 for changes in Life Stages – Singles, Couples, Families, Midlife, Empty Nests, Baby Boomers and Seniors; Ages – 20-29, 25-54, 30-44, 45+ 45-65, 55+ and 65+; and mix of Lifestyles in neighborhoods. Does the resort still offer the age, life stage and lifestyle profiles you prefer?

28) Which lifestyles profiled in the western resort towns during 2008 – 2009 remained five years later in 2013-2014?  Which disappeared entirely? Why? Which new lifestyles emerged, grew or moved in to shift the neighborhood mix? Have longtime locals been forced out by escalating property valuations and sky high property taxes?

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